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20100901
20100930
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
yesterday came from a police interrogation of the suspect, in which stephen hayes admit to raping and killing jennifer pettitte and giving a very bizarre explanation for doing what he did. also, jurors were introduced to some very graphic cell phone pictures taken of joshua sarjasky sexually assaulting 11-year-old makaila, also the chief medical examiner took the stand and told exactly how the young girls died. >> the testimony was graphic, buglio tpheufplt had interrogated hayes moments after his arrest and he was telling the detectives he raped pettitte after jakkowski sexually molested is is-year-old makila. add to go the heart break, cell phone pictures taken by saljetski of what he did with the young daughter, he painted a picture of criminals desperate for money, of a robbery that went horrifically wrong. the medical examiner testified about the final moments of makaila, saying soot was found in the house, which was set on fire. both bodies were burned but the doctor couldn't say whether the burns occurred while the girls were alive. dr. pettitte briefly spoke with the media
'll talk to mitch mcconnell as the senate returns. >>> supreme court justice stephen briar opens bup about what it is like behind the scenes of the supreme court. first, shuttle diplomacy. it has nothing to do with nasa nor the shuttle between washington and new york. it's when a diplomat is traveling back and forth between two different parties. the u.s. was able to get two sides to actually agree to face to face negotiations. today in egypt, one of those subtle diplomacy states and hillary clinton is mediating a second round of those talks. >> she shuttled herself over there. >> our produce wir will be a go between. >> we always get along. send us an e-mail. ♪ [ upbeat instrumental ] [ rattling ] [ gasps ] [ rattling ] [ laughing ] [ announcer ] close enough just isn't good enough. - if your car is in an accident, - [ laughing continues ] make sure it's repaired with the right replacement parts. take the scary out of life with travelers. call or click now for an agent or quote. >>> in an era where it only takes a cell phone to bring a caught on camera moment, first in california meg wh
declared emergencies. comedian and satirist stephen colbert took his celebrity to a u.s. house hearing today to raise awareness about farm workers. colbert recently spent a day picking beans in a united farm workers program called "take our jobs." it aims to show that few americans will do such work, leaving low-paid illegal immigrants to do it. >> i think there are way too many undocumented mexican workers here in the united states doing jobs. and i think that we've ignored this issue for too long and it is time to roll up our sleeves and face this issue imagineo-- mano a whatever the spanish word for mano is. >> sreenivasan: colbert stayed in character as a mock news commentator for much of the hearing. in india, athletes from around the world began to arrive in new delhi for the troubled commonwealth games. the event has been plagued by negative publicity about unfinished venues and dirty accommodations for athletes. and the start of competition is just nine days away. some athletes have pulled out, but new zealand and australia confirmed today their athletes will attend. rescuers i
everybody back to work. martha: stephen moore, is an economic writer at the "wall street journal." good to see you. >> hi there. martha: a couple of things i take away from what austan goolsbee said, they try to manage down expectation and don't want to say things will get better when we have a long way to go. >> that's right, by the way, martha, i have known him several years and is a good economist but what he's disabilities of here is being honest, here. being honest about the repercussions of the stimulus bill, we probably are going to have a number of more months of 9%-plus unemployment, and, this, i think is an admission, at stimulus plan did not work. remember, we were promised an unemployment rate of less than 8% by now. martha: why they are backing away from specific numbers, because, the 8% number has hung around their shoulders in an unpleasant way and there's the august number, 9.6, the highest rate of 10% and nobody is feeling great at 9.6%, and, the stimulus package, there's still a lot of money left in that. a lot of folks wonder why can't we use the money for the new sti
, watch more of stephen colbert's testimony about the plight of farm workers. plus on "art beat," jeff talks to norwegian novelist per petterson about his book, "i curse the river of time". all that and more is on our web site, newshour.pbs.org. judy. >> woodruff: and that's the newshour for tonight. on monday, we'll talk to former clinton economic advisor laura tyson, who makes the case for extending bush-era tax cuts to the middle class, but not to the very wealthy. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. "washington week" can be seen later this evening on most pbs stations. we'll see you online, and again here monday evening. have a nice weekend. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org vo:geico, committ
of the topics i discussed with supreme court justice stephen breyer, when he stopped by to discuss his new book, "making our democracy work." i love the title of this new book. "making our democracy work." that's not only the title of the book, but your mission. and you believe for that to happen, people need to understand our institutions and be engaged with them. >> yes. >> how do they do it? >> the first step is to know what it is we do. how your legislature works. how your governor works. how your mayors work. >> you also said something of a mystery. that we built up in our tradition, the norm that when the supreme court decides something, the public tends to follow. >> there's a history in this country, of bad events and marvelous events. and over time, it's led to a general acceptance of the court, of having the last word on most constitutional issues, even when they are wrong. >> that was really tested on the idea. when you were sitting on bush v. gore, the 2000 election, you wrote at the time, you were against it. it was a self-inflicted wound that hurt the court. you also point out, an
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)